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>N.T. Wright: Beyond Heaven

>A good video on youtube.com (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z50Jv-PXYb4) with N.T. Wright. He has an interview on ABC’s Nightline, where he discusses the mis-perception of many Christians concerning the afterlife. I appreciate his presentation of a biblical view of heaven and the eternal state and hope Christians will take note of it.

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Discussion

9 thoughts on “>N.T. Wright: Beyond Heaven

  1. >”Though I must say allowing the concept of divine restorative justice to supersede divine retributive justice, is an error Wright commits.”I’m not aware that he would actually put these concepts in a linear fashion like this. I think if asked, he would be more inclined to say something closer to what you said, “Therefore restoration must come through the satisfaction of retributive justice.” These things take place together. Perhaps he places more emphasis on one or even sees one as more significant in some way. Or, perhaps, I’ve misunderstood your comment. What I appreciate about Tom Wright more than anything else is that he “forces” us to the table of discussion. He may not hold the position I agree with but in his rigorous study, he makes me work harder to defend my own. This is the mark of a great scholar.

    Posted by Mark Mathews | March 6, 2008, 9:23 am
  2. >He is frequently misunderstood in evangelical circles. Although I do not agree with his position on imputed righteousness (or lack thereof) he is a great scholar and has produced some terrific studies.I agree Mark. After listening to a brilliant lecture series of his on Romans, the biblical idea of divine restorative justice became much more important in my thinking, adjusting my hermeneutic for the better I think. Though I must say allowing the concept of divine restorative justice to supersede divine retributive justice, is an error Wright commits. I think a better prioritizing of the elements of divine justice is to view disorder as coming through God’s retributive judgment against sin (Gen. 3), and sin is a personal offense to God’s righteousness. Therefore restoration must come through the satisfaction of retributive justice. In other words, I think the law-court is where the words that give being to the new creation are spoken forth. Those words did two things. First, they condemned our substitute, accounting him who new no sin to be sin on behalf of the elect. Second, they justify those who believe, accounting them as righteous on Christ’s behalf.

    Posted by M. Jay Bennett | March 5, 2008, 4:05 am
  3. >”I didn’t mean to refer to that part of his theology. I was referring mainly to the resurrection of the body.”I recognize you weren’t pointing to that. I just brought it up because, since American evangelicals started beating up on him, everything he says anymore seems to get attacked.Also, you need not go to the Nicene creed for the resurrection of the body. The Scriptures suffice on this one!!!! That’s why their comment about a radical departure is so comical. Sadly enough, it’s because you seldom hear this brought out much anymore.

    Posted by Mark Mathews | March 4, 2008, 9:09 pm
  4. >Although I do not agree with his position on imputed righteousness (or lack thereof) he is a great scholar and has produced some terrific studies.I didn’t mean to refer to that part of his theology. I was referring mainly to the resurrection of the body. I’ve seen three different newspaper pieces now that refer to bodily resurrection as a radical departure from traditional Christian teaching, and each one makes me chuckle a bit. (I’ll admit, though, that I did google the Nicene creed just to make sure I wasn’t going mad.)

    Posted by Nathan P. Gilmour | March 4, 2008, 6:15 pm
  5. >”many journalists, reviewing this book, pitch this as a radical departure from traditional Christian teaching.”This book by Tom Wright is anything but a radical departure from Christianity. He is frequently misunderstood in evangelical circles. Although I do not agree with his position on imputed righteousness (or lack thereof) he is a great scholar and has produced some terrific studies.He is also Bishop of Durham (where I live) and he occasionally sits in on the NT seminars in Abbey House on Monday nights. I must say he is very down to earth, a great scholar, and loves people. He also loves to grill the featured speakers at the seminar and is quite good at it!

    Posted by Mark Mathews | March 4, 2008, 5:05 pm
  6. >Excellent! Having been on the mission field for most of my life, I’ve of course met and come across dozens of (Independant Fundamental, KJV-Only, ect.) Baptist missionaries, many of whom don’t care about people’s troubles of the here and now, like poverty, debt, or hunger–all they want to do is preach about Heaven and Hell and “get people saved.” In my experience, it’s dificult to bring hope to needy people when their stomachs are empty or when their children are dying of common diseases because they’re too poor to afford vaccines. Christian missionaries should focus on BOTH aspects of ministry, not ignoring the here-and-now, while also giving hope for the future. Isn’t that what Jesus did?

    Posted by mhgood | March 4, 2008, 3:22 pm
  7. >I too appreciate the link, but have to ask an administrative question …Is it really permissible for Michael to post on a Montag? Isn’t this about 4 days early?I don’t want to get all pedantic up in this piece, but we can at least try to have fun with it.;-)

    Posted by GUNNY | March 4, 2008, 4:08 am
  8. >Good clip. I still think it’s amusing how many journalists, reviewing this book, pitch this as a radical departure from traditional Christian teaching. I suppose journalists don’t learn their Nicene Creed in journalism school. 🙂

    Posted by Nathan P. Gilmour | March 4, 2008, 2:23 am
  9. >Active Link

    Posted by Nathan P. Gilmour | March 4, 2008, 1:47 am

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