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>Give It Up Already, Mike!

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With the Rebublican nomination nearly in the bag for McCain, isn’t it time for Huckabee to throw in the towel? Don’t get me wrong, I like his bit about every voter having the opportunity to choose, but it almost smacks of the Democrats old “voter disenfranchisement” speech. I do think voters should feel confident that they have a choice, but the way our political system works, it appears the choice has been made. Moreover, is this not a great opportunity for the Republican party to capitalize on the division among Democrats?

One wonders at this point what Huckabee’s real issue is. Is this just a platform to promote himself for possible positions down the road in the McCain administration? Or does he just like the limelight? I don’t think it is the latter, although one always runs the risk of appearing this way when they don’t know when to concede. I suppose it doesn’t hurt for Huckabee and Paul to remain in the race, but it blows a good opportunity for Republicans to unite and show party strength rather than having two stragglers hanging on who don’t know when to quit. What it is especially troubling is that they continue to boast their conservatism in contrast to McCain, something that weakens the party in the general election. Not only that, but when staunch conservatives are backing McCain one after another at this point, I think these guys should wake up and smell the coffee.

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Discussion

19 thoughts on “>Give It Up Already, Mike!

  1. >They’ve been sitting on the story for two months now. Guess they didn’t want it to interfere with their agenda of helping the least conservative candidate became the nominee.I’m sure their mustaches have knots in them from twirling them and cackling for two whole months. 😉

    Posted by Nathan P. Gilmour | February 22, 2008, 8:07 pm
  2. >And the Free Pass Express continues for Messiah Obama.

    Posted by Jeff Wright | February 21, 2008, 6:55 pm
  3. >They probably would have sat on the story even longer (maybe save it for an October surprise) except the New Republic was about to write a story about it.But anyways, it’s a smear piece with nothing to back it up. I’m not really worrying about it.

    Posted by J.Wizzle | February 21, 2008, 6:36 pm
  4. >They’re following the script perfectly. NY Times endorses McCain and now that he is the nominee they come out with stories about extramarital affairs and shady favors for donors, etc. They’ve been sitting on the story for two months now. Guess they didn’t want it to interfere with their agenda of helping the least conservative candidate became the nominee.

    Posted by Jeff Wright | February 21, 2008, 6:33 pm
  5. > “I don’t think it would be good for the media to be soley focused just on the Democrats for the next couple months.” No danger of this happening now! McCain is going to get plenty of press now that the dirty politics are coming alive.

    Posted by Mark Mathews | February 21, 2008, 4:41 pm
  6. >The media has been giving preferential amounts of coverage to Obama & Hillary for at least a couple of months. I think they want McCain to secure the GOP nomination, so the two Democrats can begin running against him. As long as there are two viable Democrats running, McCain can’t effectively attack either one, but they both get to turn their guns on him. ANd if they keep giving Obama hyper coverage time, they will secure his nomination & election. Huckabee gives conservatives a chance to voice their opinion, even if McCain will get the nomination. If there’s nobody else running, there’s no opportunity for the remaining states to voice their preference between the moderate & the nominally conservative candidates. IF a truly conservative third-party breaks off, it will help the Democrats, but also give a wake-up call to the GOP. But my hunch is that Huckabee is just looking to the future, for he’s not conservative enough to really get enough support to start a third party.Go Ron Paul.

    Posted by Jacob | February 21, 2008, 12:45 pm
  7. >Why McCain should be happy Huck is still in the race

    Posted by J.Wizzle | February 20, 2008, 8:34 pm
  8. > “Having Huckabee in the race keeps that from happening.” I think you give Huckabee a lot more credit than is due him. McCain is going to get coverage whether Huckabee is in the race or not. Huckabee is only getting coverage because he’s making a fool of himself. “My guess is that the majority of the people still voting for Huckabee will switch over to McCain for the general election.” This I agree with wholeheartedly. And they should. “The damage has already been done.” So then we should make no attempt to correct it? I think wisdom says, while we have the chance, do what we can to correct the mess that was made and make the Dems look like they’re in a cat fight!

    Posted by Mark Mathews | February 20, 2008, 7:17 pm
  9. >Again, I just think it would help the GOP a lot more than any television coverage that Huckabee can provide. I’m not sure one can really attribute anything Huckabee is doing to “helping” McCain. He really doesn’t need it.Nah, I don’t agree with that. McCain is going to win the nomination so he doesn’t really need to worry about Huckabee. I don’t think it would be good for the media to be soley focused just on the Democrats for the next couple months. Having Huckabee in the race keeps that from happening. I don’t think McCain has to worry about the party being fractured if Huckabee stays. The damage has already been done. My guess is that the majority of the people still voting for Huckabee will switch over to McCain for the general election.

    Posted by J.Wizzle | February 20, 2008, 6:17 pm
  10. > “Or a lesson for next time will to unite around ONE conservative candidate from the beginning.” AMEN!!! The most logical statement I’ve heard about this whole primary season. I almost wrote a post about how evangelicals were shooting themselves in the foot by not getting behind one candidate, either Thompson or Huckabee, rather than splitting up their votes and the money they were raising. Like you said, Jeff, McCain won it fair and square and these extremists have nobody to blame but themselves. Anyway, it’s normally people like that who have provided no support anyway and are simply arm chair quarterbacks.

    Posted by Mark Mathews | February 20, 2008, 5:45 pm
  11. > “I’m also not sure why people are calling for Huckabee to get out but not Ron Paul.” I think its because most people are taking Huckabee a bit more serious than Paul, and rightfully so. Paul was never really a serious rival. Huckabee on the other hand carried himself well. But it’s over. Again, I just think it would help the GOP a lot more than any television coverage that Huckabee can provide. I’m not sure one can really attribute anything Huckabee is doing to “helping” McCain. He really doesn’t need it. What needs help is the GOP in the sense that we need to rebuild and promote some sense of unity.

    Posted by Mark Mathews | February 20, 2008, 5:40 pm
  12. >My last comment was in response to J_Wizzle’s.This comment is in response to hoping a Dem will win or helping them to win. That is so incredibly foolish I don’t even know to begin. If that is what they believe then they should vote for the Constitution Party’s candidate or the Conservative Party rather than voting for Obama or Clinton. Of course, what I really think is that they should grow up and support McCain. Conservatives voting for the Dem doesn’t send a message to anyone. What would the message be? Lets rig the primary process next time? McCain won fair and square. I’m not a fan of several aspects of how we select the nominee but that’s another matter. Maybe conservatives should look in the mirror and ask themselves why they didn’t do the work necessary to get more conservative candidates to run for president. Or a lesson for next time will to unite around ONE conservative candidate from the beginning.

    Posted by Jeff Wright | February 20, 2008, 5:39 pm
  13. >That’s true. It sort of forces the national media to give McCain coverage on election days and gives him a chance to keep making victory speeches. Last night’s was almost solely directed against Obama. CNN has TX McCain 55% – Huckabee 32% so things have changed since I last checked.

    Posted by Jeff Wright | February 20, 2008, 5:32 pm
  14. >” I do know a lot of staunch Republicans that are so disenchanted with the Party now that McCain is going to win it that they’re going to vote Democrat in the GE to get their message across.” These are anything but staunch conservatives. If they vote Democrat because they don’ think McCain is a conservative zombie who can’t think for himself, they’ll have to choose Obama, who has THE most liberal record going! Anyone who would do that doesn’t fall into the category of a staunch conservative but fits the bill of an “extremist” much better. McCain has received backing by many “staunch” conservatives. If the people who would vote Democrat over McCain can’t see that and don’t understand how important it is to keep a Republican as the president and to keep the party united, I’m afraid these people are just misguided. How will that prove anything to anybody? Voting Democrat and giving the presidency to the biggest liberal on the planet will really show em!

    Posted by Mark Mathews | February 20, 2008, 5:30 pm
  15. >A lot of people are actually saying that Huckabee staying in actually helps McCain. Huckabee staying in doesn’t hurt him and if he wasn’t in then all the media coverage would be completely on Obama and Hillary. If Huckabee wasn’t in the race then we wouldn’t have seen McCain making a speech on tv last night. I’m also not sure why people are calling for Huckabee to get out but not Ron Paul.

    Posted by J.Wizzle | February 20, 2008, 4:57 pm
  16. >While staying in the race isn’t helping the Republican party, Huckabee and Paul sure are getting a lot of votes! Maybe one good thing in all of this, regardless of Huckabee’s reasons for staying in the race (I already know Paul’s reasons), is that this will send a loud and clear message to the GOP: we’re conservatives! We want a conservative leader! And McCain just doesn’t measure up 100%. Possibly this could affect policies down the road, because the GOP candidate will really know what the American Republicans want. On the other hand, it could do nothing and just further fracture the party. I do know a lot of staunch Republicans that are so disenchanted with the Party now that McCain is going to win it that they’re going to vote Democrat in the GE to get their message across.

    Posted by mhgood | February 20, 2008, 3:22 pm
  17. > “Funny thing is Huckabee could actually win TX.” I think you’re right on everything but this statement. With both Bush presidents behind McCain, as well as Rick Perry and others, Huckabee is actually living in his own world thinking he can pull that off. At some point people tend to wise up and walk away from lost causes. I know I am stepping out there on this but I will be willing to eat whatever crow is cooked up for me. But I don’t think Huckabee stands a chance of winning Texas. Certainly he might get some fairly decent support, but no chance of winning. He should do the right thing and give the GOP a trump card to play against the Dems. This shows a bit of stubbornness and pride on Huckabee’s part, something he is known for.

    Posted by Mark Mathews | February 20, 2008, 3:02 pm
  18. >Huckabee knows he has strength in Texas which has a lot of delegates. He wants to pass Romney in the delegate count so he can say he came in 2nd place and position himself as a leader for the future. But TX is still over two weeks away. It would be preferable if McCain could be focusing 100% on the general election during this time while Clinton and Obama battle it out. TX is neck and neck for those two. Funny thing is Huckabee could actually win TX. I guess GOPers have to have to hope that Clinton wins TX and Ohio so the Dems can take it all the way to convention. Go Hillary Go! If McCain wins TX and Ohio, he’ll have the official count and Huckabee will drop out.

    Posted by Jeff Wright | February 20, 2008, 1:48 pm
  19. >I can’t help but remember Bill Maher’s talk show (can’t remember which one) on which Bill and Michael Moore got down on their knees and begged Ralph Nader not to run in 2004. The GOP’s real worry should be that a third-party evangelical will declare the weekend after the RNC convention. Such a campaign (financed, no doubt, by “retired” DNC operatives) would be much more a problem for the elephants than would a longer primary season.

    Posted by Nathan P. Gilmour | February 20, 2008, 1:26 pm

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